• Amazon will allow more Prime members to access the Prime Wardrobe program, which lets shoppers try on clothes before paying for them. Prime Wardrobe—which has yet to officially launch and serves as a competitor to Stitch Fix—is invite-only, but Prime members can also request an invitation. Though Prime Wardrobe is a response to the high level of returns from online purchases and a way to raise online traffic and sell through on apparel that’s not sold in a brick-and-mortar location, it will also spotlight and incentivize shoppers to purchase from Amazon’s private-label apparel brands.
  • Walmart may overrun Amazon in the fight to buy a large stake in Flipkart, India’s most successful (but not yet profitable) ecommerce startup, valued at $20 billion. If the deal with Walmart goes through, it could poke holes in Amazon’s status in India as the second-largest ecommerce retailer.
  • As South Dakota v. Wayfair Inc. is hashed out in the Supreme Court, Amazon is bracing itself for new state taxes that could be imposed on transactions through its marketplace, regardless of whether the company has a physical presence in that state. Amazon collects state sales taxes, but sellers on its marketplace—who contributed $10.52 billion in revenue in Q1 of 2018—have largely evaded them up until this point.
  • Amazon is charging ahead of Best Buy as the top electronics retailer—in 2017, Amazon’s consumer electronics sales jumped approximately 18.5%, ranking in $5.3 billion, versus Best Buy’s sales, which grew only 8.5%. But Best Buy’s electronics vertical still brings in higher traffic, with 111.6 million visits per month.
  • Amazon Echo’s partnerships with home builders are outpacing those of Apple’s, as both companies work to integrate their smart home products into new homes. Lennar, one of the biggest home builders in the U.S., ditched Apple for Amazon, outfitting new homes with Echo products that connect with Alexa. Lennar’s in-home service team also visits new homeowners to ensure that the services are working correctly—a new and frictionless way to get people to incorporate Amazon products into their day-to-day lives.
  • Amazon Fuse, a recently trademarked product that will house music, audio and video content, is working with mobile operators to distribute a growing body of media to more subscribers, especially those living outside of the U.S. The product itself isn’t entirely fleshed out, but it will likely allow mobile operators to literally fuse their media services with those of Amazon, while maintaining some level of control over their own offerings—a new way Amazon to expand its media ecosystem and marketplace.