• Amazon plans to invest $700 million in employee retraining, preparing one-third of its workforce for jobs that coexist with technology. The program will span its departments in the quest to reeducate 100,000 employees by 2025. However, a few issues stand out. For one, corporate programs like this have won little success in the past. Secondly, this may simply be a marketing ploy to soften the blow of future layoffs.
  • Prime Day, which went live on Monday and continued until Tuesday at midnight, featured an abundance of beverage and packaged food deals. This is an area where Amazon seeks greater dominance, which it’s building with the help of Whole Foods, Amazon Go, AmazonFresh, Prime Pantry and other ventures. Like last year, the company brought Prime Day offline to Whole Foods where grocery shoppers who spent $10 obtained a $10 credit to use on Amazon during the sales event.
  • Amazon pushed brands and retailers to double their ad spend and ramped up its own marketing spend for Prime Day. The company largely focused its own efforts on Google Shopping ads, which prominently highlighted deals on search results. It also pressured sellers to increase their advertising budget by a minimum of 100% in order to reap the gains of the sales event, even for brands whose products were not feasible for Prime Day deals—that is, outside of electronics and cosmetics.