• With the rise of events competing with Amazon Prime Day from retailers like Walmart and Target, Amazon’s pseudo-holiday was fueled by exclusive products and new product launches. Amazon’s Echo devices, Alexa voice assistant and Kindle e-book readers were the top grossing products this year. This should not be a surprise as Amazon offers the biggest discounts on its own devices and gives them prominent placement on its platform. Lady Gaga’s Hauslab beauty line launch, which was exclusive to Amazon, also was a buzzworthy and strategic tactic that likely encouraged new types of shopper to participate.
  • Amazon is doubling down on recruiting direct-to-consumer brands to sell on its platform—expanding its brand portfolio and helping emerging brands to jumpstart their businesses. Toting itself at the “Everything Store,” Amazon’s priority is to make all brands available on its platform. Amazon’s emerging brands program gives young direct-to-consumer businesses access to customer data, assistance with inventory management and capital investments to ensure brands maintain independence. The direct-to-consumer partnerships create more exclusive product launches and brand collaborations that live on Amazon, as it aims to retain its role as a crucial distribution platform, even for brands that have shunned it so far.
  • Amazon is not the only winner on Prime Day—large retailers on average saw a 64% increase in U.S. ecommerce sales. Prime Day deals inspire more online shopping across the US whether or not they are through the Amazon platform. Small retailers also saw a 30% or higher uptick in sales in response to more people scanning the web for online deals. The most competitive non-Amazon deals were on electronics—specifically smartwatches, smart TVS and smart home items.