The Q1 2019 Megaphone Report surveyed 51 brands and retailers, which sent a total of 1,915 marketing emails during the survey period of January 1-March 31, 2019.

This Megaphone Report is exclusively available to Plus, Team and Premier Members.

Our research calculates and classifies marketing via two different channels: email marketing and paid digital marketing, which includes Facebook and Instagram. Our analysis of these channels gives you an inside look at how consumer brands and retailers are navigating the marketing landscape, while allowing you to benchmark your own company’s marketing efficiency.

Surveyed companies are identified by Origin (Traditional, meaning it started either offline or both offline and online; or Digital, meaning it started online only) and Type (Brand or Retailer). When relevant, brands and retailers are analyzed separately.

Facebook and Instagram advertising

Loose Threads surveys all active paid Facebook & Instagram advertisements during the middle of each quarter. For special reports, data is captured during the pertinent week, such as during the Black Friday long weekend.

As Facebook and Instagram ads run on the same ad manager, they are surveyed together.

Email marketing

Loose Threads receives emails from each brand and retailer in the Megaphone roster. Our current approach is grounded in surveying how these brands market to a potential customer, versus an existing one.

Q1 2019 Superlatives

🏆Do I need to ghost you?: The RealReal

The RealReal sent 223 marketing emails (an average of nearly 19 per week) during the survey period—more than any other brand or retailer.

🏆Discount queen: The RealReal

92.4% of marketing emails from The RealReal featured discounts, promotions or exploding offers.

🏆Longest email award: Goop

Goop sent the longest emails during the survey period, though their length isn’t outrageous considering that its email campaigns double as newsletters.

🏆Emptiest inbox: Tie between Hubble and Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton and Hubble sent zero marketing emails during the survey period.

🏆Sassiest subject lines: Reformation

Clickbait-worthy subject lines comprised 88.6% of the Reformation’s email campaigns during the survey period—a higher percentage than any other retailer. Notable (apathetic) contributions include “#EMOTIONS” and “DO YOU EVEN CYCLE.”

🏆Loves its customers: Rent the Runway

20% of email marketing campaigns from Rent the Runway featured customers, not models—more than any other brand or retailer.

🏆Party animal: Winky Lux

18% of email marketing campaigns from Winky Lux included invitations to events—more than any other brand or retailer.

🏆Biggest activist: The RealReal

5.4% of email marketing campaigns from The RealReal included information about a service, in this case consignment—more than any other brand or retailer.

🏆Biggest philanthropist: Brandless

4.9% of emails from Brandless included information about the company’s philanthropic activities—more than any other brand or retailer.

🏆Club promoter: Tie between Nordstrom and The RealReal

100% of emails from both Nordstrom and The RealReal featured information about signing up to the Nordy Club or RealReal Rewards—more than any other brand or retailer.

🏆Testing you: Stitch Fix

100% of emails from Stitch Fix included a quiz—more than any other brand or retailer.

Q1 2019 Notable mentions

🔔What’s your sign?

Both Revolve and Warby Parker sent email campaigns that classified products and styles by astrological sign. Apparently Aries like sleek silhouettes.  

Companies are also curating product assortments based on other self-classification systems. One email from Sephora allowed customers to shop by skin type.

🔔Drop a pin

In March, Everlane targeted snowed-in New Yorkers on its email list to pitch its new rainboots, a geotargeted campaign.

🔔The Instagrammy’s

Revolve not only featured the Instagram posts of customers and influencers in 30.2% of its email campaigns during the survey period—it also sent an email that mimicked Instagram in an innovative blend of the two channels.  

🔔Logging off

Digitally-native brand Tecovas used email marketing to notify customers of their its first physical store in Austin. Matches Fashion did the same for a pop-up in LA, while Bevel used email to spread the word about its launch at Target.

Core Insights

Type of ads

Signups and downloads were the most common attribute for email marketing campaigns among both retailers (21.1% of emails) and brands (14.6% of emails), with Nordstrom and The RealReal performing the strongest. 
Discounts, promotions and exploding offers played a less prominent role in Q1 2019 email marketing campaigns than in Q4 2018, but they still ranked as top attributes. Among retailers, they also ranked as a top main purpose—most commonly for The RealReal. 
Static images were more common than gifs in email marketing campaigns among both retailers and brands, but both Winky Lux and Nordstrom Rack embraced the latter.
Featuring multiple products was the top main purpose for both retailers and brands during the survey period.
3.3% of retailer email campaigns served to notify customers of an event—a positive trend for companies such as Sephora and Nordstrom that incites shoppers to meet them IRL.
1.9% of retailer email campaigns featured editorial content, as did 2.7% of brand email campaigns—a sign that companies including Net-a-Porter, The RealReal, Ritual and Zara are taking more ownership over messaging by merging content with commerce.
Tecovas featured testimonials in nearly 19% of emails compared to 1.4% of brand emails overall—a sign that brands overwhelmingly seek to control their messaging in this channel. 
7.9% of emails from retailers such as Matches Fashion and Net-a-Porter featured an edit—a campaign with a curated list of products that helps sort through their massive inventories by theme.

Retailers sent nearly 3.5x more emails than brands during the survey period on a relative basis.

The second Megaphone Report, which gathered data from 12 retailers and 39 brands, found that retailers sent nearly 3.5x more emails than brands in Q1 2019 on a relative basis. On average, each retailer sent 82 emails during the survey period, compared to only 24 each per brand.

Likely, retailers feel justified sending a higher number of emails because they have a much wider assortment to notify customers about than brands. But it’s unclear if customers actually want this or have different appetites depending on whether a brand or retailer is emailing them.

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Playbook

  • What insights do you have from customers about their preferences regarding email frequency?
  • How can you square your email output with these preferences and/or recalibrate your output on different marketing channels?

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The RealReal sent more emails than any other retailer and Michael Kors sent more emails than any other brand. Two brands—Hubble and Louis Vuitton—sent zero emails during the survey period.

  • The RealReal sent more emails during the survey period than any other retailer—223 emails in total, or nearly 19 per week on average. But despite a heavy email marketing footprint, the retailer significantly pulled back its Facebook & Instagram ad output, running only 52 ads in the survey period, compared to 431 in Q4 2018 (an 88% decrease).
  • Michael Kors sent 83 emails during the survey period—more than any other brand.
  • Ulta Beauty sent nine marketing emails during the survey period—fewer than any other retailer.
  • Both Hubble and Louis Vuitton sent zero marketing emails during the survey period. Le Labo sent one email during the survey period to introduce a new fragrance, while Rimowa sent two: to celebrate Lunar New Year and to introduce a product collab with Bang & Olufsen.

While secondary sales retailers The RealReal and Rent the Runway focused heavily on emails during the survey period, beauty retailers Sephora and Ulta Beauty relied more on paid Facebook & Instagram ads while the approach of subscription retailers Dia & Co. and Stitch Fix diverged.

In Q1 2019, the digital marketing approach of both The RealReal and Rent the Runway skewed heavily on email campaigns as opposed to paid Facebook & Instagram ads. In terms of showcasing products, this makes sense in that both companies amass large inventories (consignment and rentals) and email campaigns provide a larger, more controllable canvas for companies to speak about their brands and products. (Additional reporting on The RealReal and Rent the Runway has pointed to their more customizable email marketing strategy that divulges to individual customers how much they saved by buying secondhand or renting.) Nevertheless, it’s unknown whether The RealReal’s customers are happy to receive nearly 19 emails per week on average (Rent the Runway sent about six emails a week during the survey period, compared to an average of four a week in Q4 2018).

On the other end of the spectrum, cosmetics retailers Sephora and Ulta Beauty poured most of their attention into paid digital ads on Facebook & Instagram; Emails only comprised about 28% and 20% of their total surveyed outreach, respectively. It’s possible that social media channels align better with beauty brand and their products because they more easily showcase application, but given that loyalty program members make up the majority of their consumer base, these retailers might have something to gain from more curated or personalized emails à la Rent the Runway and The RealReal.

The discrepancy between subscription apparel and accessories retailers Dia & Co. and Stitch Fix’s channel approach is also curious. Email marketing campaigns comprised only about 38% of Dia & Co’s total surveyed outreach in Q1 2019, but they accounted for more than 68% of Stitch Fix’s outreach. It is clear, however, that Dia & Co.’s emails were largely centered on how to order a box, sprinkled with a handful of educational campaigns (how to measure an inseam, how to create a spa experience at home)—complex processes that are better suited for email campaigns than a small rectangle or square on Facebook or Instagram, where its marketing appealed to the emotional side of shopping for extended sizes with customer testimonial videos.

Though all of Stitch Fix’s emails included a styling quiz and it sent monthly style guides notifying customers of new products, it could do more to take full advantage of the space an email campaign provides to talk about how its subscription service works, feature customer testimonials, or build the brand with educational content. This could be related to Stitch Fix’s older age and status as a public company, which means more consumers are likely to understand how its service works than that of Dia & Co. Stitch Fix’s Facebook & Instagram also helped flesh out more of these questions in Q1 2019. That being said, none of Stitch Fix’s marketing materials on either channel included people, which gave the subscription experience—pitched as a personal stylist who caters to individual customer needs—a distinct flatness.

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Playbook

  • How can you personalize your email campaigns as did The RealReal and Rent the Runway, even if you don’t have a lot of data on new customers?  
  • What is the most effective way to take advantage of the space that an email campaign provides, as opposed to a Facebook or Instagram ad? At the same time, when would shorter emails work, which don’t require scrolling—a tactic Glossier frequently employed?
  • As with the discrepancy between Stitch Fix and Dia & Co., what are your competitors doing in their email marketing that you can apply or should avoid in your own strategy?

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The vast majority of subject lines for both brands and retailers were straightforward, followed by catchy or clickbait-worthy prose. Even fewer relied on time-sensitivity to get recipients to click out of FOMO.

The Q1 2019 Megaphone Report added an additional subject line indicator: urgency. Urgent subject lines on email campaigns feature time-sensitive copy intended to spark FOMO among recipients and incite them to open up the message—an action that will ideally lead to a sale. “Today’s The Last Day” (Bevel), “Final hours: you might want to wake up for this” (Casper), “Valentine’s Day gifts: there’s still time to order!” (Nordstrom) and “SALE Ends TODAY! Additional 30% Off Sale Styles” (Vineyard Vines) all tapped into the fear that after a short period of time. But as with any promotions-based strategy, an occasional short-term or flash sale is much different than a business model that is built on these types of discounts. Nordstrom Rack, for example, promoted weekly online flash sale “events,” which aren’t problematic in and of themselves, but could be for a company already built on off-price retail.

As with Q4 2018, straightforward subject lines were most common among both retailers and brands (slightly higher than last quarter), while catchy or clickbait-worthy subject lines accounted for about one-third of their email output during the survey period (slightly lower than last quarter). Reformation had the highest percentage of clickbait-worthy subject lines at 88.6% of email campaigns during the survey period, followed by Goop (88.2%), Revolve (73.7%) and Ritual (76.7%). Noteworthy subject lines included:

  • “WALKMAN SOLD SEPARATELY” (Reformation)
  • “DO YOU EVEN CYCLE” (Reformation)
  • “urine trouble” (Goop)
  • “DROP. EVERYTHING. IT’S HERE.” (Revolve)
  • “One word: tacos.” (Ritual)

Whether a pun, a call to action or a colloquial millennial reference, these subject lines catch the attention of a consumer scanning through their crowded inbox, especially when a vitamins and supplements brand is talking about tacos.

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Playbook

  • How can you use urgency to catalyze more immediate action from your customer base without burning them out?
  • How can you use clickbait to help your email campaigns stand out in a crowded inbox without relying on discounts and other sales? How can you mirror your brand’s personality and value systems to your subject lines?

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Signups and downloads were the most common attribute for email marketing campaigns among both retailers (21.1% of emails) and brands (14.6% of emails), with Nordstrom and The RealReal performing the strongest.

More email campaigns in Q1 2019 encouraged shoppers to signup to a membership or loyalty program, or download an app, compared with Q4 2018. Among retailers, which featured this attribute in more than one-fifth of all emails surveyed, Nordstrom and The RealReal performed the strongest, both including a small bar about their memberships (the Nordy Club and RealReal Rewards) at the bottom of every email.

Nordstrom also sent one email campaign in the quarter that was entirely dedicated to information about the Nordy Club—Sephora did the same to outline the benefits of joining its Beauty Insider Program. Not only did this elucidate how each membership program—which are often complex and multi-tiered—functions, but for Nordstrom, singling out the Nordy Club in email marketing served to bolster the debut of its revamped membership program in October 2018, which now offers more personalized perks and gives members a clearer picture of their reward status and points. In February alone, all of the 35 email campaigns that the full-price retailer sent in February 2019 included a section at the bottom inciting shoppers to look into the perks of joining the Nordy Club. But more importantly, 40% of these emails also included a prominent section highlighting the loyalty programs’ exclusive offers, up from just over 5% in December 2018.

Featuring the Nordy Club served to differentiate Nordstrom from the off-price Nordstrom Rack, considering how similar their emails otherwise appear. Aside from its loyalty program, Nordstrom also included a small bar about shipping and picking up items in store in every email, and often included other information about its services in a Q&A format: “Can you bring my online purchase to my car?” or “I could really use an expert’s opinion. Can you help?” This further underscored Nordstrom’s white-glove services against those of Rack. If the revamped and higher-frequency messaging around Nordy Club can grow membership and Nordstrom’s other services can attract customers to its full-price brand, the company will receive a positive boost, not only vis-à-vis Rack, but vis-à-vis other retailers: The company has reported that current participants in the program spend four times more and shop three times as often at Nordstrom than non-members.

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Playbook

  • Like Nordstrom or The RealReal, how can you ensure that part of your email campaigns point to your membership and loyalty program and/or your app in each message? How can you spotlight your membership program and/or app in other ways to ensure that customers won’t gloss over it when scrolling through your emails?
  • Like Stitch Fix’s styling service or Sephora’s Beauty Insider program, what aspects of your business are the most complex, and how can you answer questions about them in your email marketing?
  • How can you tweak your email campaigns in order to speak to your most loyal customers who are more likely to shop and interact with your brand?

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Discounts, promotions and exploding offers played a less prominent role in Q1 2019 email marketing campaigns than in Q4 2018, but they still ranked as top attributes. Among retailers, they also ranked as a top main purpose—most commonly for The RealReal.

Discounts and promotions were the second-most common attribute for email marketing campaigns among both retailers (17.8% of surveyed emails) and brands (11.4% of surveyed emails). The RealReal was the biggest abuser of discounts, which appeared in 92.4% of all its marketing emails in the surveyed period. While this promotional rhetoric is problematic for luxury brands, it seems to be working for The RealReal, which sells secondhand luxury, offering premium used goods at an accessible price.

In addition, The RealReal’s stores in LA and New York bring the brand to life in a new way, unburdened by such language. It’s therefore eye-opening that a number of discounts by the retailer in its emails encouraged customers to visit the company in person by offering double the amount off of his or her next purchase at one of its LA or New York stores than online. This will incentivize the digitally-native company steer consumers to its owned retail stores, which will likely deepen their relationship to the brand, while also promoting a luxury feel, even if the prices are more affordable.

Noticeable among the brands and retailers surveyed this quarter is also purposeful discounting versus constant discounting. Sephora’s Weekly Wow series—a set of deals for one week only that launches almost every Thursday—provides ample contrast to J.Crew’s seemingly unending promotions.

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Playbook

  • If you are a retailer or brand that often offers discounts like The RealReal, how can you use these promotions to drive other aspects of your business, such as in-store sales?
  • As with Sephora vs. J.Crew, how can you ensure that each discount you provide has a purpose—either on the front end (the Weekly Wow) or the back end (to get rid of surplus inventory)—in order to prevent brand dilution?

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Static images were more common than gifs in email marketing campaigns among both retailers and brands, but both Winky Lux and Nordstrom Rack embraced the latter.

More than three-fourths of emails from retailers and brands included static images, while only 21% of emails sent by retailers and 22% of emails sent by brands included gifs. As with Q4 2018, plain-text emails comprised a negligible percentage of surveyed emails.

The slightly higher percentage of gifs from brands may be attributed to the former’s greater focus on product development. Though more retailers are pursuing private labels, brands—particularly digitally-native ones—are all competing to prove that their research and design is superior, while retailers are typically better off filtering their inventories in unique ways to gain a customer’s attention. Winky Lux included gifs in its emails 89.5%—the highest rate among brands—and Nordstrom Rack did so in 52.3% of emails—the highest rate among retailers.  

Featuring multiple products was the top main purpose for both retailers and brands during the survey period.

For the second quarter in a row, email campaigns most commonly served to feature multiple products among both retailers (55% of surveyed emails) and brands (26.3% of surveyed emails). A higher frequency among retailers is likely related to the need to sort through a larger collection of products. Email campaigns also allow for much more real estate to feature multiple products in product grids or columns, which isn’t possible beyond a handful of products on Facebook & Instagram.

Emails featuring new products were also common, comprising 7.6% of email campaigns from retailers and 17.6% of email campaigns from brands. A higher frequency among brands is likely related to their more intentional product development, especially among newcomers to the consumer space, whereas retailers are promoting both third-party and private-label products.

Overall, however, the product-based nature of the majority of emails (62.6% of retailer emails, 59.6% of brand emails) as well as their emphasis on discounts (22.6% of retailer emails, 15.3% of brand emails) grounds the email strategy across retailers and brands in Q1 2019 and highly transactional. The top four main purposes for both brands and retailers remained product- and discount-based. Judging by the graphs above, only 3.3% of retailer emails served to notify customers of an event and 14.7% of brand emails included a gift guide. Companies can do more to develop this type of campaign material, as it will help them establish an identity beyond simply a product company.

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Playbook

  • Given the excess of emails featuring multiple products for both brands and retailers, how can you use email marketing to feature your inventory in a non-transactional sense? How can you invite customers to discover this assortment themselves? How can you use both digital and physical experiences to do so?

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3.3% of retailer email campaigns served to notify customers of an event—a positive trend for companies such as Sephora and Nordstrom that incites shoppers to meet them IRL.

Q1 2019 saw an increase in email campaigns featuring events, from 0.3% of all emails surveyed in Q4 2018 to 3.3% of email campaigns from retailers during the first quarter of 2019. Some of these events also doubled as marketing for offline retail, which helped to bridge the gap between digital and physical experiences. For example, Sephora notified customers of a free Fenty Beauty “mini makeover” event—a 20-minute service that email recipients could book at their local store by clicking on a button. Nordstrom also promoted an event to “celebrate the season’s freshest trends with a week of all things beauty, including expert consultations, free samples, gifts with purchase and more.” The retailer encouraged email recipients to call or visit their store to RSVP—another call to action that would steer shoppers to a Nordstrom location, or at the very least, talk with a sales associate on the phone. Comparing the two, Sephora facilitated attendance more by letting shoppers sign up themselves online. The specifics of the event were also outlined more clearly in Sephora’s email campaign than that of Nordstrom, which remained vague. On the other hand, Nordstrom’s RSVP setup may have held attendees more accountable because it required consumers to interact in person or on the phone with the brand if they wanted to partake.

Brands also used email marketing to spread the world about events. As Michael Kors illustrated, not all events have to be in person in order to build brand affinity among consumers. The company debuted a noteworthy strategy in two of its emails during the survey period, inviting shoppers to watch a livestream of its fall 2019 runway show. While other luxury brands have avoided opening up their catwalks to viewers out of brand preservation, Michael Kors’ decision to do so aligns well with its accessible luxury brand and provides a meaningful way for customers to connect with the company. At the same time, while the company included a bar at the bottom of 98.8% of its emails to incite consumers to stop by or locate a store, Michael Kors could do more to increase foot traffic, especially considering its decision to shutter 125 stores in 2017 because of low sales.

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Playbook

  • Looking at Sephora vs. Nordstrom, how can you notify customers about an event in a clear fashion, while holding them accountable for an RSVP?
  • Like Michael Kors’ livestream, what other “invitations” can you use so that customers can interact with your company both digitally and in person?

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1.9% of retailer email campaigns featured editorial content, as did 2.7% of brand email campaigns—a sign that companies including Net-a-Porter, The RealReal, Ritual and Zara are taking more ownership over messaging by merging content with commerce.

The Q1 2019 Megaphone Report included a new email marketing attribute: editorial content. As consumer companies fight to stand out against competitors, more are turning to content marketing, content syndication, and other, more hybrid models of content merged with commerce to decrease their dependence on paid advertising channels such as Facebook & Instagram while also enhancing their brand beyond transactions and products.

While still a minor percentage of both brand and retailer’s email marketing strategy this quarter, companies created editorial content in a variety of ways. Net-a-Porter, which launched a print and online publication called Porter Magazine back in 2014, used the email channel to promote new issues, including an image and a short blurb about the covery story, a selection of related items for sale, and a grid of the magazine’s top stories for recipients to “Read & shop.” The shoppable magazine, published every two months, is the brainchild of Net-a-Porter founder Natalie Massenet, the former Editor-in-Chief of Women’s Wear Daily who, sought to create “a magazine for the 21st century instead, a hybrid between a store and a magazine that was delivered digitally.” The retailer’s email marketing reflects this vision, operating to provide readers with editorial content about fashion trends, brands, designers and how-tos, while also promoting Porter Magazine subscriptions (which often come with product gifts).

Net-a-Porter is far from the only retailer to embrace media and product simultaneously. The RealReal, for instance, sent an email campaign in Q1 2019 that included a Q&A with the designer Victor Glemund about cultivating a more inclusive fashion industry; This content likely aligns with the luxury consignment retailer’s customers while also illustrating the retailer’s values. Brands looked to editorial content as well—Ritual sent out the first volume of its downloadable magazine, Essential Women Quarterly, while Zara notified customers about VIEW.S, a collaborative project with the design school Chelsea College of Arts. Email recipients could click a button within the email in order to learn more and watch a video about the collaboration.

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Playbook

  • What type of content is most relatable to your customers? How can you introduce this content in an email campaign? What are the pros and cons to showcasing this content in an email or having recipients click out to view it?
  • What are your company’s five-year ambitions? How will editorial content help your company achieve these goals and potentially offset pure marketing spend?
  • How can you make your editorial content instantly shoppable? Or, is it better to create editorial content with less of a connection to selling product?
  • How can you use the email marketing channel to build your brand without selling products, like Ritual did with its downloadable magazine?

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Tecovas featured testimonials in nearly 19% of emails compared to 1.4% of brand emails overall—a sign that brands overwhelmingly seek to control their messaging in this channel.

Corporate messaging dominated email marketing from brands this quarter, with only 1.4% of emails featuring testimonials. Among brands, Tecovas had the highest percentage of emails that contained testimonials at 18.8%. For example, the company sent out a March recap, stating that it “surpassed 30,000 50-star reviews,” spotlighting customer testimonials on three different boot styles. Everlane embraced a similar strategy for the rainboot it launched in Q1 2019, but also published Instagram photos of customers wearing the boots above their product reviews. One email campaign included a testimonial at the very top: “The perfect every-season boot—stylish, but practical”—a commitment from the brand to use customer rhetoric to market its new SKU.

Still, brands could benefit from allowing more customers to speak for their brands, particularly in the wellness and cosmetics categories. Though Harry’s and Dollar Shave Club featured testimonials heavily in their paid Facebook & Instagram ads, neither included them in their email campaigns.

Additionally, only 0.05% of brand emails during the survey period included media references, which more companies could take advantage of in order to gain credibility. Some of the best examples came from Tommy John, which sent an email with reviews from Business Insider, Real Simple and Refinery29 about various underwear styles and Kylie Cosmetics, which used email marketing to celebrate and encourage consumers to shop its award-winning lipstick shade, voted best pink lipstick by Allure Magazine.

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Playbook

  • Given Everlane and Tecovas’ testimonial-centric emails, how can you ground your email marketing purely in customer voices?
  • Where are your customers talking about your brand and how can you incorporate these images and words in your marketing, either in email or social media channels?

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7.9% of emails from retailers such as Matches Fashion and Net-a-Porter featured an edit—a campaign with a curated list of products that helps sort through their massive inventories by theme.

Nearly 8% of email campaigns from retailers included an edit, compared to only 1% of emails from brands. This makes sense given that retailers can use an edit to call attention to a specific set of products across their large assortment. In many cases, it also doubled as celebrity or influencer marketing, allowing a figure outside the brand to voice their opinion on its merchandise, which can garner customer interest.

In February 2019, Matches Fashion debuted a new series called Curated By, which features styles and pieces selected by an influential figure in its email marketing and on its site. For its first series, the email from Matches included images from a photo shoot with the LA-based tattoo artist Dr. Woo wearing his chosen styles, alongside easily shoppable product grids that dissected individual products. Net-a-Porter also created an edit to mark the release of the cover story for Porter Magazine. In late February, one of these emails featured its cover with actress Ellen Page, followed by the editor’s “wish list”—four products tied to Page’s shoot.

Brands also included curated lists of products in their email campaigns, often using them as a platform for company founders. In an age when entrepreneurs in the consumer space take on a celebrity quality themselves, Outdoor Voices and Kylie Cosmetics used edits to highlight Ty Haney and Kylie Jenner’s top product picks. Both email campaigns included images of products and the founders wearing them. Though a small detail, the latter campaign was sent from Kylie Jenner, rather than Kylie Cosmetics, which opens a more direct communication channel between the founder and the brand’s shoppers off of Instagram.

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Playbook

  • How can you most effectively curate selections of your inventory in order to get shoppers’ attention?  
  • Which public figures embody your brand and its values? How can you include their ideas, rhetoric and images in your email marketing in order to give consumers a new perspective on your brand?
  • How can you use email marketing (or Facebook & Instagram paid digital marketing) to give the customers the sense that they have a direct channel of communication to real people, rather than a corporation?

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